Groups I would consider joining…

After some thought on the subject, here are some organizations I think I would consider becoming a member of at some point in my life, preferably after a long period of study of the occult and reading everything I want to read.

I want to stress first that the reasons I have for joining a group are entirely pragmatic. I think it might be easier to become a member of a group of like-minded people and a structure and achieve my goals through them. Would I be bound those groups? That depends on if they suit me consistently. Would I stay a member of those groups after having achieved my goals through them? It is yet to be seen, but if I do then maybe it’s at that point that I might start my own group one day. But anyways, let’s get on with it.

 

The Greater Church of Lucifer

The Greater Church of Lucifer is an organization that promotes what it refers to as Luciferian philosophy, which is based around what is referred to as the 11 Luciferian Points of Power – the full doctrine is laid in a short book titled Wisdom of Eosphoros, which I highly recommend. It is lead by Jeremy Crow, Michael W. Ford and Hope Marie Ford; Jacob No was formerly among the group’s leaders but left citing apparent personal pressures. This church, of sorts, is for those who wish to illuminate the Black Flame, the flame of individual divinity and awakening. Those who Luciferian philosophy follow desire self-excellence, build knowledge and power of the self to fulfill desires in life and attain a sort of apotheosis and mastery in both the material and spiritual realms. They have no particular stance on the atheism vs theism debate, and membership is basically open to Luciferians of any disposition regarding theism or atheism. There is a certain emphasis on balance in the Luciferian teachings – namely the balance of light and darkness, of carnal and base instincts and intelligent and spiritual consciousness. There is something about their particular teachings that appeals to me, including the emphasis on balance. In my life, I have come to be kind of big into balance at least as a theme, and balance is a theme I have kind of noticed play out in recent times regarding culture wars and social/political conflict as I have come to understand a pendulum swinging in one direction or another. The influence from Michael W. Ford is something I have an interest as well, as I plan to follow his work.

Also, can I just say that the above image is simply fucking brilliant. There’s the main sigil which conveys the ideals of Luciferianism (as I explained in a post where I practically endorsed the Luciferian philosophy), then there’s the figure of Lucifer – who suspiciously resembles the archangel Michael – brandishing a sword and standing with shimmering rays of light behind him and then there’s the flames and embers in the background. It is a wonderful aesthetic expression of the GCOL and its ideas.

 

The Sect of the Horned God

The Sect of the Horned God is organization which combines atheistic and rationalistic Satanism with elements of pagan (or arguably neopagan) metaphor and symbolism. Similar to the Greater Church of Lucifer, the main goal of following the Sect’s philosophy is for the individual to cultivate the Black Flame, but the founder Thomas LeRoy also describes the main goal of the philosophy as achieving a kind of freedom so profound that even if an individual were incarcerated he/she would still be a free human being. Through doing so, the Sect hopes that the individual comes to consistently live and cultivate a life of vital existence. There are four degrees through which an individual may pass: Neophyte, Acolyte, Cenophyte and Hyperborean. All of them represent stages of the progression of the individual member. There are also five orders in the Sect that can aid the individual as they ascend the degrees and an individual can participate in them. They are the Orders of Pan, Cernunnos, Prometheus, Dionysus and finally Shiva. They correspond to the five elements (including “spirit”) and by passing through each of them the individual can learn about the Left Hand Path, critical thinking and even altered states of the self. Its philosophy is very strongly influenced by the ideas ideas of Carl Jung, Joseph Campbell, Friedrich Nietzsche and Anton LaVey, and they are definitely far closer to Anton LaVey’s original brand of Satanism than The Satanic Temple are.

There is no literature attributed to the Sect, but the founder Thomas LeRoy produces video content on his channel for the Sect in order to espouse the philosophy of the Sect. Any reading material they recommend probably includes the works of the authors I already mentioned. I have watched a lot of LeRoy’s videos and I like his take on Satanism and mythology. I am also fascinated by their more rationalist take on occultism, and I think it could be useful to me.

 

The Temple of Set

tos_logo

Founded in 1975 following a major schism within the Church of Satan, the Temple of Set is the embodiment of the vision of Michael A. Aquino, for whom there are very few words to describe his intellect and character. Aquino started the organization in response to his disappointment with what he felt was the increasingly exclusively materialist teachings of Anton LaVey’s Church of Satan and his odium towards the fact that LaVey began allowing members to move up certain ranks of the Church through financial contributions, which opposed his strictly meritocratic view of how the Church should run – namely, that people should move up the ranks based on how they have grown and developed intellectually, spiritually and so forth.

The Temple of Set is very much true to Aquino’s vision, and in fact I think they might be an organization that has rather high standards for its members. They focus on the gift of willful conscious existence, which they believe is unique to Man, and enshrine consciousness above all else. Followers practice what they term black magick in order to evolve the self, and I’m guessing they don’t think of magick as mere psychodrama like LaVeyan Satanists do, but rather actual magick and sorcery (something that, I have to be honest, still perplexes my more rationalistic tendencies). Great discipline is required of initiates, which is actually one of the main reasons I would be interested in Setian philosophy because I often feel I lack discipline and wish to cultivate more of it, though I fear I lack the discipline necessary to actual be a Setian or at least an Adept or Initiate of the Temple.

Satan, Set, Isfet, evil, and morality in the Left Hand Path

Imagine the following if you will: Madness. Injustice. Terror. Instability. Social decay. The prevalence of corruption. The general disintegration of the bonds that hold people together. Brother turning against brother, sister against sister and so forth. Complete disorder and mayhem. Rampant violence. Riots, looting, and senseless destruction. The vices of mob mentality, or even mob rule. The woe sown by dictatorships. The bloodshed of a massacre. A world ruled by malice, hatred, and hostility, with no room for love, reason, or any of Man’s brighter qualities. The general feeling experienced by an individual when he/she loses control of everything around him, particularly through circumstances or actions that send his/her life in the wrong direction. The state of living in the constant fear that you will die for no good reason. A kind of disharmony which threatens the lives of human beings (and lifeforms, for that matter).

For many people, all this is what is normally referred to as “chaos”. But chaos can be a nebulous concept. Is it that woeful plague of disharmony and terror? Or is it primordial chasm, sea or abyss before creation as spoken of in many mythologies? Or is it that force of primordial power that motivates all of existence as I once thought of it? To be fair though, I may not necessarily refer to the last one as Chaos any more now that I recognize the force I described in the Nietzschean concept of Will to Power, the Setian and Luciferian concept of the Black Flame, the force of vital existence as described by Anton LaVey, or rather the power of the Adversary as described by Michael W. Ford (which is why I have a significant interest in Luciferian and Adversarial magick and particularly in the way Ford describes it). Back in August, a friend of mine and fellow blogger named G. B. Marian discussed three terms from Egyptian mythology that refer to three different kinds of “chaos”, albeit whilst discussing a mutual appreciation of the band Black Sabbath. For him, there was Nun, Kheper/Xeper, and Isfet. Nun was the primordial state of inertia from which all things originated. Kheper was the power of transforming, becoming, and being, and was associated with the creation of the cosmos – the modern concept of Xeper is also an important part of the beliefs of the Temple of Set, referring to the power of self-awareness, freedom, and isolate intelligence. Isfet was the concept of the dissolution of harmony and the bonds forged between human beings, a state of disorder that lead the cosmos back into the inertia of Nun if left unchecked. It’s the third concept that most people would identify as “chaos”, and the concept that is part of the focus of this blog post.

Isfet also seems to refer to the concept of uncreation. This is important to remember because destruction, or what is sometimes called “chaos” can be a good thing or be carried out in service of the order of the cosmos (or Ma’at). Such constructive chaos is famously embodied in deities such as Sekhmet and Set, particularly Set who was the original protector of Ra who hacked the being known as Apep with his weapon. Speaking of Apep, the concept of Isfet as uncreation could safely be said to be embodied by Apep, for he sought the annihilation of the cosmos – with no real motivation other than for the evulz as far as I can tell. By seeking to undo everything that existed and embodying annihilation, Apep was uncreation. Apep was sort of an embodiment of Isfet.

By defeating Apep, Set drove back the forces of Isfet – the forces of uncreation, disorder, and disintegration.

Sometimes Isfet is seen as synonymous with another concept, evil. But evil can be a loaded term, moreso than chaos. Generally it refers to everything bad for the mind, soul, ethics, and life of the human being and the community at large. It’s also very loaded because the religious have always presented their own notions of “good” and “evil”, and everything outside of their dictated morality was almost always denounced as “evil”. In the Jewish and Christian mythos, Beelzebub’s only real crime was simply being a popular deity worshiped instead of Yahweh/Jehovah. Satan’s only real crime was embodying the fleshly instincts of human beings, and their ego. The only reason Lucifer was supposedly cast from heaven was that he didn’t want to ruled by Yahweh/Jehovah, and who the hell would want to be ruled by him? Most of the devils are only “evil” because they’re devils or embody certain “sins”, but I can’t think of most of them being really malevolent beyond the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic point of view.

When I originally embraced Satanism back in around June 2013, I did so based on my own instincts which I found the philosophy in alignment with. And even though Satanism doesn’t really embrace concepts like “good and evil”, and it’s purely an egoistic philosophy, I never abandoned any sort of ethical/moral concern and still felt there were some things that were simply wrong, and others were right. At least I recognized this was from a mostly subjective perspective. But I also view morality/ethics as a human desire, as much a desire as any of our other desires. I believe that out of our selfish or egoistic nature can arise a kind of natural morality – a morality not dictated as mores and commands from on high that we are compelled to obey for no good reason of our own, but rather a morality that is based on one’s own desires, own feelings, own determination of right and wrong based on both one’s own nature or drives and on human reason. And I think that most in people’s morals, the madness that makes up the concept of Isfet would be intolerable for a number of reasons, the opposing of Isfet, or that which leads to it, would be ethical and quite natural for another number of reasons. On the Left Hand Path, good and evil are usually treated as abstract concepts, specifically abstract concepts that serve only to be dogmatic, restrictive and conducive of slave mentality. It’s certainly true that the morals dictated by the outside can be that way, and often are. But I feel that in the Left Hand Path, there is room for practitioners to pursue their own kind of natural morality, to follow our own moral instincts and beliefs that arise from our own nature, for they are just as . Defying the norms, mores, rules, and Gods who we deem are unjust, we carve a path of freedom where we are responsible unto ourselves, and smite those who would threaten our life and liberty and that of those we care about (and who, in a way, embody Isfet in the process). In a sense we follow the examples of Set, Satan, Lucifer, and the other lords of the Left Hand Path.

Modern Setian tradition holds Set is either the bringer of individuated consciousness (or isolate intelligence) or the embodiment of it. He is also believed to be the Dark Lord behind the notion of Satan, thereby the oldest mythological symbol of such a concept. They both are believed represent the individuated consciousness of Man and its nature. Set shows us the power of a strong will and individuated soul or consciousness triumphing over uncreation, carrying forth the light of the sun. He may point to the individual’s struggle for survival, for personal power, for the future. Of course, that’s just one interpretation. It’s also interesting to me that Set is in some way linked to storms, and that Christian Satan (from my point of view) has links to at least one storm deity (that would be Ba’al). Satan, as Man’s egoistic self embodied in myth, and Lucifer, the Lightbringer, oppose a “God” in whom they see a new force of uncreation, a ghoul who stands against life, accomplish, and self-worth. I believe that in the Satanic, and Luciferian, traditions, we defeat the nihilisms that degrade our perception of the world and send us into retreat and embrace life, and we fight for our authentic selfhood against the doubts sent our way by the world or our fellow Man. We live as authentic, strong individuals, free men and women, pushing back the uncreation and that which we consider to be evil or a threat, just as Set does. And in our hearts, we carry forth our light of creation, as Set helps the light of Ra travel through the underworld.

The Lovecraftian character Nyarlathotep as depicted Persona 2. Something like that only less humanoid would represent Apep and Isfet quite nicely in my books.

Control and the political dichotomy of the people and the state in a Luciferian context

There was a video released by Michael W. Ford on his YouTube channel about the Greater Church of Lucifer and its focus. It was very inspiring, and it particularly gives a good idea of how to conduct yourself as a Luciferian, shows me that having like-minded individuals doesn’t detract from your own individuality or that of your path, and actually inspired me to print out and laminate a business card  with the 11 Luciferian Points of Power on it, so that I can carry the 11 Luciferian Points of Power with me everyday and hopefully remind myself to pay closer attention to them and try and apply them regularly in my life. In other words, a good reminder of the basics for Luciferianism.

For your potential viewing and learning pleasure I will put the video itself below.

There’s actually one unique point I feel inspired to comment on as the main subject of this post: that the Luciferian understands that all politics is ultimately about control, and that control is not in itself a bad thing. For a while, I thought about that? In what sense is control not a bad thing? It’s a common thought that control means the ability of external bodies such as the state to impose their own will upon the individual, without the consent of the individual. Naturally then, it could be assumed that the obvious reason why a person like myself would support libertarian political philosophy and libertarian spiritual philosophies such as Satanism and Luciferianism would be because people like me detest the idea of control in the external sense, because we don’t want to be controlled by anyone. But in the internal, individual sense, control means something rather different. Self-control is a good thing, it’s one of our important faculties as beings with individuated consciousness capable of mastering our own destinies. It’s also vital is we are as a species to achieve any kind of self-sufficiency, or if we are to avoid lapsing into mob-mentality and complete suggestibility. It’s precisely because most of us do not believe we can control our own lives and achieve that self-sufficiency that the imagined need for external authorities arises in the minds of many people. As author Ryan Holiday put it:

Control and discipline of one’s own reactions make for a successful person and a functioning society. I don’t think you want to live in a world where that isn’t the expectation of each of us.

It’s also vital that we don’t practice any kind of restraint simply for the sake of submission to polite “society” or for the sake of winning the favor of others, but instead for the benefit of yourself so that you may cultivate discipline, patience and mastery, and fully cultivate any kind of autonomy. You can’t be a fully autonomous human being if you lack the self-control that makes you completely suggestible to various whims and negative emotions any more than you can if you are a complete robot or drone constantly acting in obeisance to the will of others without any sort of independent thought whatsoever.

Politics as simply external control, however, is something that can seem like a sensible conclusion. Once you look behind the certain of often baseless moral hyperbole, you may find that few politicians are ever interested in a greater ideal alone. Worse, if they are, they may be devoted only to that ideal, and either uninterested in its practical implications or unable to answer for them. One need only look at America’s current presidential election cycle to see this play out. That’s not to say it isn’t admirable to sacrifice pragmatism in the name of a principle, after all I tend to instinctively be a “liberty over prosperity” person myself, as evidenced in my own personal Euroscepticism – while others in the UK may prefer to Remain in the EU out of concern for the country’s economic standing, I choose Leave as a matter of the principle of independence from a distant and indifferent external authority regardless. But the thing with many idealists out there is they may be blind to any concern for pragmatism or practical application of their ideals. Only their crusade matters.

But getting back to the point, it does seem obvious that many politicians are only out for some kind of control. Any attempt to find any moral justification in authoritarian or illiberal legislation being proposed by governments or politicians yields the same result: that there is no real ethical or logical value in them, so they are purely mechanisms designed to bring control into the hands of the State, or sometimes into the hands of other bodies such as religion. A good example is probably the anti-pornography legislation that the UK government has been trying to introduce, with of course some backing from the British press (and not just sensationalist papers like the Daily Mail, but also “educated” papers like the Guardian and even The Independent). A familiar argument is that pornography is supposedly damaging the minds of those exposed to it and increased availability leads to sexual violence. However, research done on the subject suggests exactly the opposite: that increased porn availability reduces sexual violence rather than increases it. Indeed, this debacle is a very old one. In America during the year 1970, then-President Richard Nixon tried to get rid of pornography and claimed that its “warped and brutal” portrayal of sex was damaging the public at large. His own administration, upon conducting research on the subject, produced a report which concluded that there was no evidence that pornography had any harmful effect on anyone, and naturally discouraged anti-pornography legislation for adults. But Nixon himself rejected the report and its content as morally bankrupt and continued to oppose the right of adults to watch pornography regardless. In the absence of any ethical or logical justification, it was nothing more than a move to put control of some of aspect private life in the hands of the state.

Since the dawn of civilization, or even the dawn of mankind and communities in general, Man has attempted to exert control over populations of people. In the ancient world, it was perhaps more transparent, especially on the matter of war. From wars carried out by nations to conquer foreign territories (from the ancient world right up to the modern age), to civil wars fought in divided and fractured nations (the many wars fought between rival powers in China and Japan are a great example), the aim is often quite transparent: domination, control, the establishment or preservation of one’s political power. Whether or not this was good or bad was usually not a matter of principle, especially not in the modern Christian sense, but rather – as always – dependent on who was wielding power. A good ruler may have put conquered territory to good use and enriched the lives of newly conquered people, preserved a just and prosperous civilization by fighting wars of defense, and used his/her power to enrich the nation or community or simply preserve what is already good. A bad ruler may have treated a newly conquered people with cruelty for no good reason, subjugating them and his/her own people, often for short-term and petty gains, cultivated a corrupt civilization, destroys anything good about it and established dominion and took power only for the sake of having dominion over others and carrying out cruel, extravagant or tyrannical whims. Sometimes, though, a bad ruler is simply an incompetent one, or even one who will not accept and use the strength and power that he/she needs in order to do any good for a nation or community. Even so, power is power, control is control, and many of the dichotomies in our civilization have been ultimately of power versus power. History will always have its way of deciding who was good and who was bad, or rather help us make that judgement for ourselves, but ultimately political power is neither good nor bad, unless applied in such a way by the individual. Just as, like Michael W. Ford said in the video I put here, the individual can make the GCOL great or diminish it entirely through his own efforts or lack thereof, so too is power as tool that can generate, preserve, destroy, or diminish based on the individual wielding it.

What’s important to remember is that in the ancient world, there was simply the rulers and the ruled, and the relationship between them was mostly static, rather than dynamic. Sometimes there was room for the people to rebel against their rulers, but very rarely did it feel like the people had the “right” to dissent (the Mandate of Heaven in China is the only example off the top of my head that I can think of, where the people actually have the right to get rid of their ruler if he is found to be unjust at least in the eyes of Confucian morality). And usually, civilizations were ruled by monarchs who wielded basically absolute political power. With the rise of democracy (read: representational democracy, not direct democracy), the people generally have more of a say with regards to who rules them. This doesn’t always mean more freedom for the people from control, and there’s the chance that such very freedom can be put to a vote – the people have sometimes willfully given control to the State through the vote. But it does mean that the people have a more dynamic relationship with the state, and they can win some control from the State. Representational democracy, from what I understand, hinges on a kind of balance or power struggle between the powers of the state and the people, even though I generally prefer that the best government is the least and favor the rights and freedoms of the people. I also notice that the fascists, the totalitarians, and the authoritarians always seem in favor of disrupting that dynamic relationship in favor of a more static one, perhaps suiting their extreme black-and-white outlook. The anarchists, and to some extent the communists, also want to do away with this dynamic relationship in favor of “rule by the people” or “stateless society”, thinking that the people have the self-sufficiency to do without it or will just operate out of “the goodness of their hearts”. But, until such time as we as a species at large cultivate such self-sufficiency that we no longer have any need of governments and external authorities, we will have to deal with the dynamic relationship and power struggle that defines our democratic civilization, continue to strive to make it work for us as best as possible, and maybe we’ll get a little closer towards achieving the self-sufficiency that will make external authority obsolete for the vast majority of people. In a sense, that is how you free Mankind from external control: not by working to replace the dynamic relationship found in democracy with a more static relationship (thereby reverting to the ancient past) or by destroying it entirely for a species who has not achieved the self-sufficiency required to do without it, but through an evolutionary process – one that, for better or worse, democracy is very much a part of.

Plans for esoteric study

Recently I feel motivated to conduct more detailed study of occult books, particularly Michael W. Ford’s books on Luciferianism and Luciferian magick. Lately I have been feeling like I could benefit from some study on ritual in order to produce greater results in the realm of magick and achieve the results that I intend to produce.

Some of the books I plan to look at include the following:

  • Adversarial Light: Magick of the Nephilim by Michael W. Ford
  • Bible of the Adversary by Michael W. Ford
  • Luciferian Witchcraft by Michael W. Ford
  • Adamu: Luciferian Tantra and Sex Magick by Michael W. Ford
  • Liber HVHI by Michael W. Ford
  • The Satanic Bible by Anton LaVey
  • The Satanic Rituals by Anton LaVey
  • The Seven Faces of Darkness by Don Webb

The Ford books will be studied in a certain order beginning with Adversarial Light and ending with Liber HVHI. I also plan to look into a few books on Hindu Tantra, Buddhist Tantra, Japanese esoteric Buddhism, and ritual pertaining to all three of those areas where I can find them, unless some of the listed books from Michael W. Ford cover the bases from Eastern lore. That, and I can always use more Satanism books, and not just LaVey’s books either.

I have already been reading at most three of the books (Seven Faces of Darkness, a little bit of Adversarial Light, and another little bit of Bible of the Adversary), and perhaps I could read more. I’ve read some interesting things so far, and I plan to take notes along the way. To be honest, I may have to crystallize my magical direction from all this and generate a more refined and defined system that’s still true to my desires and nature, only better at getting what I want out magick.

On the opening of the Greater Church of Lucifer

On Halloween in Old Town Spring in Texas, the Greater Church of Lucifer has opened a building for the first time, thus facilitating a public physical venue for people to explore the Luciferian belief system. I may be late in saying this, but I would really like to offer my congratulations to the Greater Church of Lucifer for their successful opening of their first building, particularly for carrying on as planned after being greeted with hate-filled Christian protest and vandalism. I also offer respect and praise to the neighbours of the GCOL who do not agree with their teachings but still respect their right to exist and to spread their teachings to those willing to listen.

An image of the GCOL building in Old Town Spring, Texas.

This development represents not just the potential success of the Greater Church of Lucifer as an organization, but the hope that Left Hand Path philosophy will break the domination of Right Hand Path philosophy on a wider level. As fantastic as this all is, it’s also part of why it’s frustrating to hear that the GCOL have apparently been vandalized again.

Haven’t we had enough of people’s childish hatred of other belief systems, and their equally childish delusions of the God-given superiority or natural ordinance their own belief systems, making a mockery of the notion of freedom of religion and civil rights? Is it too much to ask that anyone other than Christians or members of other mainstream religions can set up their own organization and physical buildings in peace and liberty? And the funny thing is, I haven’t heard of Christians hatefully vandalizing buildings from other religions, not even mosques. I know The Satanic Temple has received death threats for their Satan statue, but pretty no actual vandalism (though that might be because of the security and privacy of their unveiling).

My best wishes to the Greater Church of Lucifer, and all I can say is good luck and keep up the thick skin, because I’m worried that more struggles await and that people are going to keep vandalizing the GCOL building either because they have no understanding of what they are doing wish to keep playing childish games or because they’re just jerks looking to derive gratification through hooliganism and see the non-conformists as acceptable targets (you know, the same kind of people who killed one Sophie Lancaster for kicks). Other than that, I would say that I hope somebody starts vandalizing these fundamentalist Christian churches just to show them who’s boss, but the danger to that is that it would only lead them to feel confirmed in their persecution complex.

May Chaos come alive?

Writing the post on the Luciferian Points of Power actually gave me another idea as well. I’ve have been reading it and so far haven’t found about the passionate, chaotic, and free life force that the information on the back has implied yet, but as I think about the idea of a passionate, chaotic, wild life force, I feel like I just want it more and more, a real investment of interest towards it coming on.

I think about the force of Chaos, or perhaps the Adversary or Adversarial Force is a better term for it, and my desire for it is greater, perhaps because when I think about it I am reminded of that which I have held in the beginning, as though I have returned to it with greater understanding or new ideas. I think of that kind of life force I think of Chaos, the Adversary, Satan, The Black Flame, the Hindu Shakti as a force (and for that matter, the power associated with Shiva), and the power of Set and the power of isolate intelligence. I would also identify it with the power of heavy metal music. I’m even tempted to refer to Babalon of Aleister Crowley’s Thelema despite that Babalon is that thing you surrender yourself to (then again I might say the same of the divine Shakti according to Hindu teachings). But honestly, I’m not yet sure of the best term for it. Though if it’s really the Black Flame, or the Adversary or Adversarial Force, then just think about it for a second: Luciferianism would effectively be presenting what I’ve been trying to define in the early days of my personal path.

This could be one way of visualizing it.

Whatever it is, I think I definitely want to experience it, feel more of it, become empowered by it more than ever. I want to feel it in light and in dark forms, I want to feel it in creation and destruction, I want to feel it in imagination and creativity, I want to feel it in love, in conflict, in the thrill of battle, in emotion, in desire, in ambition, in competition, in my very being. I would like it to be so liberating and empowering, I want it to strengthen my spirit, my will, my soul, I want to know that it is the core of my being. Who knows, working with it might just dissolve not only fear and doubt but also the boundaries between emotion and reason, intellect and passion, and all in a manner that’s conducive to my being and individual to me. This might entail a conquest of my limitations, or simply the limiting of my limitations, if that makes sense. It doesn’t really matter if this force is simply my interpretation of a life force that may be considered to others, because at least that still means its uniquely my life force, or the life force I identify with. It should not be the life force to surrender to in an external form. It should be a life force within that fuels your individual being, gives you strength and life.

The only question lies in how this ties in with the mind in general, rather than overpowering it, and how this affects the arrangement of the deities I set out earlier. From at least an aesthetic point of view, part of me thinks that the deities of Asian religions that I like could go on the light spectrum of this force, as well as the light and heat of the sun, while the demons and devils can go on the dark spectrum of that force, but that’s just one simple idea, and I really hope I don’t have to overhaul my altar space too drastically. As for the conscious mind, who knows. Maybe I want to take a page from the Temple of Set or even Hinduism for this one. There’s probably a few things I can gleam from Hinduism, Taoism, and hopefully Shinto when dealing with this force.

The 11 Luciferian Points of Power

What are the Points of Power exactly? They are basically a guideline for individuals to consider if they are interested in Luciferianism, intended to serve the Luciferian well no matter what stage he/she is own in his/her own path and in life. These eleven points are considered to be cornerstones of Luciferian philosophy as presented by the Greater Church of Lucifer, and if you find that most of them align with you, you’re likely to be a Luciferian and you’ll probably fit in with the GCOL should you choose to join. In a sense, it kind of sounds like the Nine Satanic Statements written by Anton LaVey.

Below are the 11 Luciferian Points of Power:

1. Lucifer represents the light of intellect, wisdom and power unique to each individual with the courage to ascend to this responsibility.

2. The symbol of the Adversary is that of the self-liberator and spiritual rebel who inspires self-evolution.

3. Lucifer represents the balanced torch bearer of Venus: the Light Bringer as the Morning Star and the Night Bringer as the Evening Star.

4. The Adversary symbolizes the spark of consciousness which questions everything, manifesting the individualistic path with accountability only to the self.

5. The fall of Lucifer or Satan symbolizes the liberation of the mind from the slave-mentality and the courage to explore and master the darkness within. One may not offer the illumination of the Morning Star without the wisdom of the darkness within.

6. The Adversary represents rebellion with purpose: wisdom, strength and power.

7. Lucifer represents the courage and fortitude to acquire healthy self-love, leading to the responsibility of honoring your temple of mind, body and spirit.

8. To become your own god you must have the wisdom and strength to govern and guide your life as if your mind is to survive beyond the mortal body.

9. Indulgence with restraint, love for the deserving and disdain for those undeserving.

10. Lucifer represents the insight that every act, no matter if perceived as selfless, is at core a selfish act. Even if helping others is your passion, the brain still receives a chemical reward triggered by the act. This is why many consider that doing good deeds in society may bring you closer to “god”. Recognize you are selfish, then see this fact in all others while observing. Accept this and then with this knowledge, make choices that would benefit not only yourself but your loved ones’ when possible.

11. To become a god is to fully understand that you possess the power to create and sustain your path in life and illuminate the light of self-determined potential.

– written for the Greater Church of Lucifer by Michael W. Ford

That having been established, here’s my personal take on each of them.

  1. You know, that does sound like part of the Lucifer I envisioned, but it seems more like it’s saying intellect, wisdom, and power are reserved for those with the courage to seek it out. I don’t really make an argument with that sort of point, because in a sense this is actually true. Those who aren’t afraid to learn will learn, and those who seek power will find it.
  2. As far as I understand, The Adversary is a kind of force or energy, one that is perhaps associated with beings such as Lucifer, Set, Satan, and other chaotic or rebellious entities (I would say Typhon can be included in those ranks). I often thought of the power of the Adversary, or the adversarial current, as being basically the same thing as the Chaos I tend to envision. I used to think of this force as being a force in nature and the universe that the individual could learn to sense and tap into, but now I think of it as more a force of the human mind or the human self, in essence adopting a psyche-centric (or is it psychocentric?) approach that has been nurtured through reading Stephen Flowers’ Lords of the Left Hand Path. I have a copy of Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra where the text on the back says “Nietzsche argues that the meaning of existence is not to be found in religious pieties or meek submission, but in an all-powerful life force: passionate, chaotic and free”, which I am beginning to read in the hopes of discovering more about that force. I must wonder if this force is the same as The Adversary or my own definition of Chaos. In any case, I’d say rebellion isn’t the only quality of the Adversary, and while rebellion and self-liberation are very important, it’s passion that is just as important. Any Adversary worth its salt is surely an Adversary armed with conviction and belief in itself and its own power.
  3. Because Lucifer is tied to the planet Venus, and because Venus and the other planets were once believed to be two stars (the morning and evening stars) before we knew about the planets, Lucifer has come to embody because light and darkness. In a sense, Lucifer as an archetype could be said to represent not just a kind of freedom to explore both light and darkness, but consciousness towards both as well, the willingness to wield them both.
  4. If the Adversary is the life force I suspect it might be, I’d say it is the spark of consciousness but more about life itself I’d say questioning everything is more a matter of individual thought and intellect, and the conscious choice to question everything.. That’s not to say the power of the Adversary or its archetypes can’t inspire that, though that’s a subjective matter in and of itself. To question everything in my mind is more about questioning all that other people want you to believe, to challenge that which other people would chain you with, and take most things with a grain of salt.
  5. It’s funny how Lucifer and Satan are sort of conflated here, but I suppose the breaking from slave-mentality is more important than this, and both Lucifer and Satan, whether conflated or mutually distinct, can be powerful forces for that within at least the Western cultural framework we’re familiar with. The importance of exploring and mastering darkness to me lends to the dissolution of the boundaries between light and darkness. In my experience, Nature has been an effective teacher during this autumn season. I’ve thought about light and darkness on my own terms and asked questions about them, but one powerful thing for me was simply stepping into my own backyard not just to see the sky become dark, but to bask in the sky becoming dark and gaze at the moon shining in the sky. It was beautiful, and it did make me think about light and darkness being different phases of each other, without implying that I saw nothing but the same thing in both of them.
  6. You could point to strength, wisdom, and power as goals for the self, perhaps defined by a belief system centered around the Adversary or its archetypes.
  7. That also sounds like the Lucifer I envision, and I would add that self-love is important. For one, it’s essential to the development of the individual and his/her ability to act and think without fear or doubt, and it’s important to the character of Lucifer. After all, even with his noble goals and ideals, who is Lucifer without his boundless love and pride for himself?
  8. This is another important tenet, but there’s one characteristic to this one that really stands out: as if your mind is to survive the mortal body. This is something I don’t see often in LHP belief systems, though they might accommodate it. And yet, it makes sense as one of the essential goals of the Left Hand Path: immortality. The primary doctrine of all Left Hand Path systems is autonomy of the individuated self, soul, and/or consciousness, in contrast to Right Hand Path systems where the self is expected to be reconciled, harmonized, or unified with some outer consciousness, intelligence, spirit, or body in the universe. Therefore, it would follow that soul seeks to preserve its autonomy by surviving death, rejecting oblivion, and proclaiming its own immortality. That’s a very strong element.
  9. Somehow I think this could have been worded better, or been two separate points entirely. Other than that, I feel the points are well-taken, and the part about love and disdain in particular to me is basically the same the Satanic principle of love only to those who deserve it, hatred to those who deserve it, and indifference towards everyone else. I should point out that while restraint is important, I should also point out that individuals don’t always want to use restraint. I know I tend to feel like I just want to let myself go sometimes. I do think that an element with restraint can come with that kind of awareness mind you, and it is important to always respect the rights and dignity of others while pursuing indulgence of carnal desires.
  10. Another highly important tenet, but also one of the key common areas between Luciferianism and Satanism. That spiritual egoism is hugely important for both systems and a crucial part of the individualism in these systems, because you can’t be the master of your own life and yourself and think of handing that self over to another power. There’s also the emphasis on the notion that, by accepting your own selfish nature, you are able to benefit your loved ones as well as yourself through the choices you make.
  11. This might be the most important tenet of them all, because above all else the individual must understand that he/she alone can sustain his/her own path in life, and is the only power fit to influence his/her life. This means the individual needs to own not just his/her life but the power and wisdom needed to govern, and the individual needs to believe in his/her own self, even in those moments we all run into when we fall off the horse so to speak. The notion that the individual has the power to affect his/her own life requires a serious investment of belief in his/her own potential, and that’s the important thing if Luciferian goals, or indeed the vast majority of any goals, are to succeed for the individual.