More madness about guns and gun laws

Just yesterday a murder-suicide style shooting occurred at the University of California, Los Angeles. From what I’ve gathered, there are those who wish to use this event as proof that America needs tighter gun controls before the bodies of the victims have even gone cold, and everyone on the anti-gun camp has once again opted to straw-man the NRA and gun rights advocates. Especially Cenk Uygur of The Young Turks, whom I suspect I will have to pick a fight with one of these days because of how obnoxious the man is. One phrase that comes up among anti-gun advocates is the term gun-free zones, which are spaces where carrying and using firearms are forbidden. The thing is, the UCLA was a gun-free zone. There is clear evidence for this as the institution has a policy clearly forbidding weapons on university property including firearms barring some exceptions.

What can clearly be drawn from this is that there were explicit restrictions on the presence of firearms on the UCLA premises, and those laws were still broken. And just like seemingly all these shooters, the perpetrator committed suicide thereby evading lawful justice. It seems obvious that rules were in place and presumably observed by everyone on the premises except the shooter, who obviously would have no intentions of observing these rules. And yet in spite of the facts of the matter, the anti-gun progressives still call for stronger laws. It begs the question: how much stronger do you want your regulations before you realize that the law, rules and the power of the state don’t change much.

In other words…

Instantly, I feel like this situation also reminds me of something that happened here in the UK. Back in 2010, a man named Raoul Moat took a sawed-off shotgun and killed two people (including himself) and injured two more people in a manhunt that took place in Northumbria. The same year, another man named Derrick Bird killed 12 people, including himself, and injured 11 others in a shooting spree in Cumbria, using a shotgun and a rifle. In the UK gun ownership is viewed as a privilege, whereas in America it is one of the fundamental rights guaranteed in the Constitution. You can’t carry guns, whether openly or concealed, you need a license issued by the police in order to own a gun, and you’re outright prohibited from privately owning even hand guns, whereas long guns (such as shotguns and rifles) are regulated by the law. British gun laws are generally seen as strict, but they didn’t stop someone from breaking the rules – nay, two people from breaking the rules. Surprise surprise, there was outcry over gun control, and The Guardian even joining in. Strangely enough though, David Cameron discouraged what he saw as “knee-jerk” reactions. He was probably quite right to do so – too bad that he . If anything, however, the laws only got more invasive in this country, with the government in 2014 allowing the Association of Chief Police Officers to carry out random checks on registered gun owners for fear of them being “vulnerable to criminal or terrorist groups”, effectively persecuting law-abiding citizens. And funny enough, according to MPs, young people in this country have been managing to illegally obtain firearms over the last three years. And again, this is in spite of the laws in place in this country, which are seen as so strict that some people are calling for them to be relaxed.

The bottom line: the whole furor over gun laws not working is madness. There were laws, but criminals don’t obey laws, and the worst thing about this is that the American public have been compelled to talk about the UCLA shootings as a political issue all while the bodies of two people who died haven’t gotten cold yet, and while you can find a PDF of the UCLA’s gun policy simply by searching for it on Google. What happened at the UCLA was a crime, and the matter of gun control at the UCLA is already an open and shut case. But the progressive majority refused to do something so simple as search for the UCLA’s gun-free zone policy before engaging in pointless virtue-signalling and calling for tighter gun control, all instead of leaving the dead to rest in peace and their families to grieve!

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2 responses to “More madness about guns and gun laws

  1. the USA does look like it has a problem with gun violence, but rather than look to the UK’s model, it seems more sensible to just look to Canada, which has a culture of legal gun ownership, and nothing like the same problems. I agree these things get hijacked by simplistic political crusaders

    • I think that the USA might never stop the problem of gun violence by simply invoking the power of the state, and I certainly doubt that Americans will ever give up their gun rights or their culture of gun ownership as a right. I think it would be better not to use the power of the state in any capacity whatsoever. Either the shooters are just downright crazy, or there’s something about them that simply can’t be solved by the state and can’t be solved by enforcing laws or making tougher laws.

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