The glory and honour in war is gone

War used to be about power, ambition, and glory, but in the modern world, it is nothing more than a game of money, worthless politics, and the manipulation of human life. Though war has often involved the organizing and even using of human lives to the ends of nations, in the old days there was more glory and honor involved. Ever since the 20th century, war has simply lost whatever honour it has.

Sure, we have bullets and explosions now, which would ideally make things more exciting, but in the end, it doesn’t feel like anything other than politicians sending young adults to their graves for political and monetary gains, a far cry from the days when one would fight for glory, conquest, and dignity. The only case of honor or a noble cause would be Middle-Eastern and North African uprisings and civil wars fought in the name of destroying tyranny, and even then, nations like America try to intervene and ruin that honorable fight.

And to add insult open injury, the supposed bastions of morality are shown to be not only killing innocent women and children, but laughing about it, even enjoying it, as though they aren’t dealing with innocent human beings. And soldiers do not come back with glory, but emotional suffering and trauma instead. War in the modern world is not about warriors, it’s about soldiers, those who give their lives not for glory, as they would believe, but in service of their puppet-masters.

No glory, no ambition, no honor, just degradation, manipulation, and slaughter without justice. That is modern war.

Advertisements

3 responses to “The glory and honour in war is gone

  1. Very good post. I have come to realize that soldiers are not “heroes” and war is not “heroic” at all. Neither should be praised nor glorified. This does not mean we should consider soldiers to be evil or demonize them. However, war and those who serve should, at best, be seen as a necessary evil. At worst, as you hinted at – pure evil inspired by money and greed. Instead of, “thank you for your service” we should be saying, “I’m really sorry you had to do that and I hope you move on completely to a better point in your life.”

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s